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June 2024

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I Dare You – June 2024

I Remember When


‘I remember’ almost always refers to the past. Sometimes people, places or situations can live in our memory forever. We may even long to relive some of those times. They helped shape our lives and who we are today.


Spring has brought some welcome changes in color and new growth. Here we are, already into June. Summer is coming, the kids will be out of school. Time to barbecue and swim and visit family and friends. Some of us are still planting in the garden and landscaping like crazy.


What do you remember about this time of year? Do you have a memory you would like to share from your past? A memory from your childhood, adulthood, or old age? How did it impact you? What do you remember? What has stayed with you all these years? Was there a certain scent, a distinct smell you remember each time you visited there?


I remember when…


Rod:
Lambing time. The first of May. Lasted 21 days. 50 ewes had 100 babies on the ground within 21 days. This was in Antago, Wisconsin, 70 miles from Lake Michigan and 20 miles from Superior. They were English Moreno sheep who had a Dorset gene which were known to produce twins. Princess, a black sheep, had triplets seven years in a row and took great care of the babies. A third of the flock were her offspring. They were fun to watch. Their whole day playing, I marveled at their activities. In the evenings when we were done with dinner, we would watch them running full speed ahead, turn 180 degree angle and run in the opposite direction.


Barbara Kingsawfer:
I remember back in the day when it would snow in town and you could walk in the middle of the road kicking snow. Zero traffic. Birch street and Liebert street were dirt. It was so quiet, so magical. The main traffic light was the only one, no traffic lights south of town. Ranchos was a separate town, Sagebrush Inn was way far away. Big stretch of mesa with nothing.


Jason Moore:
I remember catching fireflies in the fruit orchard in Nebraska and keeping them in a jar by my bed like a night light. I have only ever seen fireflies in Taos Canyon at the end of June. Last year I saw them. They appear to be the same here and in Nebraska but there are fewer here. I am concerned that the fireflies could be killed by pesticides.


Alice:
I remember collecting used cigarette butts outside at the local small town tavern. We would try to find the biggest one to smoke. I was 13, probably too young to smoke. I wanted to be, I was a real cowgirl and this was the start of it. Right when it was getting warm, we would ride our horses to the river and take their saddles off and ride bareback into the river. The water was over their heads. The horses loved swimming. One time, my horse who had never crossed the river, went right in and plunged under the water, completely under water. Rose flying out of it with me still shooting in the air on all fours! An amazing feat.


Lanny:
I remember when I was in grade school at the end of the school year when spring fevers were rushing and everyone was excited. The teachers could not control us and we were overflowing with joy. In town now in Amherst, Massachusetts, the students are sleeping overnight at the university mall. They are protesting that the Palestinians are being starved. The police are arresting students. There are five colleges here, it’s going on all over. It’s not alright. Graduation is coming. Kids are in an uproar. Still the river runs high, the apple blossoms are here and everything is coming to life.


Helga:
I remember springtime growing up next to a lake. It was warm enough to jump in but it was freezing and icy cold and then the sun would warm you up again. This is in southern Germany, a lake called Ammer Lake, in an area called the Five Lake Lends. The lake had a specific smell; a little swampy, cattails, water plants and ducks lived there. It was 3 km wide and 20 km long. In the winter it would freeze and we would ice skate on it. Back in the day the Haflinger horses were used to draw carts carrying barrels of beer. They would drive the wagons across the lake on the ice.


Meg:
I remember horseshoe crabs at Holly Pond growing up. They were a big deal to catch and scary with all their legs and sword. They looked prehistoric. The pond led out to Long Island Sound. There was a little beach and alot to explore especially at low tide. We could ride our bikes there. All the neighborhood kids and families played there.

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